Whitley H35 Hypoxystation used in heart regeneration project

H35 Australia 1

Dr. Vaibhao Janbandhu is a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute (VCCR) in Sydney. He has been in contact with Don Whitley Scientific to explain how his lab’s work has benefited from the use of a Whitley H35 Hypoxystation. Vaibhao uses the Hypoxystation to isolate, culture and characterise adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs).

 

Dr. Janbandhu had already been using a H35 that was set up at the institute for almost three years before he got his own unit installed last year. Specifically, his project is to find new ways to stimulate heart regeneration during ageing and after heart attack. For this he needs a way to isolate, culture and characterise adult CSCs. In Vaibhao’s words the H35 Hypoxystation seems well suited for this application: “the DWS Hypoxystation provides a highly stabilised HEPA-filtered environment in which levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide, temperature and humidity are precisely controlled and it will be an integral part of the project to advance the project aims”.

 

Vaibhao explains that mammalian stem cells reside in a specialised cellular microenvironment. This niche and the stem cell niche is characterised by a low partial oxygen pressure. This hypoxic niche protects stem cells from deleterious effects of O2 on proteins and DNA. These precise conditions are essential for Dr. Janbandhu’s work as they accurately replicate the in vivo environment.

 

His work also see benefits when comparing the use of a Hypoxystation as opposed to using a CO2 incubator. Typically, cell culture work involves methods which include isolating cells under their usual physiologically relevant conditions and then working with them in “bench-top conditions” where cells are exposed to non-physiological oxygen. This can then lead to altered hypoxic response, metabolism, reactive oxygen species and DNA damage response. This metabolic stress introduces unknown outcomes and may lead to results inconsistent with physiological processes. Therefore, the precise control of oxygen levels in cell culture has been shown to be vital for reproducible and physiologically relevant results, transforming the working environment in Vaibhao’s lab.

 

As well as the precise controlling of conditions, Vaibhao likes the remote access feature on his H35 Hypoxystation. The remote access allows Vaibhao to log into his Hypoxystation’s touchscreen control whilst away from the unit, offering increased flexibility in his working methods. Additionally, he likes how he can view operating conditions, set parameters and change access levels remotely.

 

Dr. Janbandhu opted to purchase a Hypoxystation from Don Whitley Scientific for the level of service and specification we were able to provide in Australia. Other companies either couldn’t fulfil configuration requirements and didn’t provide sales and or service in Australia. Don Whitley Scientific’s office in Australia, provides both fantastic sales and service nationwide. Vaibhao also states that from “discussion with other research groups across the world we felt confident to go for a DWS Hypoxystation”.

 

Dr. Vaibhao Janbandhu has this to say about Don Whitley Scientific Pty Ltd: “I would like to thank your company personnel at the customer services division in Australia for their excellent support. Your Sales & Service Manager in Australia, Grant Shallcross, took care of all my queries in a jiffy!”. Vaibhao added that the funding for the purchase came from the James N Kirby Foundation and the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute.

 

H35 Australia 2

Stem Cell Research in Stockholm

 

Stem cell researchers from all over the world are currently convening in Stockholm for the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). Topics covered in the event range from pluripotency and differentiation through regeneration to disease modelling and tissue engineering. All aspects of reprogramming and stem cell maintenance on the one hand, and differentiation on the other hand, are intricately influenced by the cellular microenvironment. Oxygenation is a crucial parameter throughout all these processes, both in the natural stem cell niche and during culture in the lab. Low oxygen promotes efficient expansion of stem cells in culture while supporting maintenance of the stem cell phenotype. Hypoxia can increase the proliferation rate and inhibit senescence of stem cells, and promote healing directly and through paracrine effects. Therapies utilizing hypoxic cells exhibit improved homing and engraftment to the target tissues as compared to normoxia. Hypoxia is a major determinant of many diverse aspects of stem cell biology.
Don Whitley Scientific will be at the event exhibiting their largest cell culture workstation to date – the Whitley H135 Hypoxystation.

Hypoxia and stem cells

Later this month, the international stem cell research community will be travelling to Stockholm for the upcoming International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) meeting covering diverse topics from reprogramming and pluripotency of stem cells through tissue engineering and organ regeneration to therapy with stem cells.

Whitley H135 Hypoxystation
Whitley H135 Hypoxystation

Hypoxia is a crucial parameter determining the fate and development of stem cells, which leads Don Whitley Scientific to exhibit the Hypoxystation controlled environment workstation for low oxygen cell culture (see us on stand no. B15:33). Dr. Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at our American distributor, HypOxygen, has summarized five recent papers delineating the role of hypoxia in stem cell research:

(more…)

Hypoxia and Immunity

Whitley H35 HypoxystationThe upcoming Cell symposium “Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity” will shine a spotlight on research delineating the complex cross-talk between inflammatory processes, immune response and the development of cancer diseases. Don Whitley Scientific will be exhibiting the Whitley H35 Hypoxystation (pictured right), a controlled environment workstation for low oxygen cell culture, at the meeting on June 14-16 in Sitges, Spain.

As we look forward to the conference, Dr Burga Kalz Fuller, Product Manager at our American distributor, HypOxygen, has summarized five interesting and recent papers concerning hypoxia and its role in immunology and cancer research:

1.         “A mechanism of hypoxia-mediated escape from adaptive immunity in cancer cells” Barsoum et al, Cancer Res. 2014 Feb 1;74(3):665-74

In cancer cells exposed to hypoxia, HIF-1α induced expression of programmed cell death ligand PD-L1, which increased the cells’ resistance to CTL-mediated lysis and contributed to tumoral immune escape. This effect was blocked through administration of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), an agonist of nitric oxide signalling, suggesting that NO mimetica inhibiting PD-L1 may present a novel cancer therapy strategy.
2.         “HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications” Harris et al., Hypoxia 2014:2 47–58

Host defense through innate immune cells takes place in a low oxygen environment where functions as diverse as cytokine secretion and pathogen phagocytosis are modulated by HIF’s. This review summarises the roles of HIF’s in acute and chronic immune response and gives a perspective on therapies targeting the HIF pathway.

3.         “Identification of CD300a as a new hypoxia-inducible gene and a regulator of CCL20 and VEGF production by human monocytes and macrophages” Raggi et al., Innate Immunity October 2014 vol. 20 no. 7 721-734

Hypoxia is characteristic for sites of inflammation and lesion, and monocytes and other immune cells accumulating in these hypoxic areas are specifically stimulated by the low oxygen environment. Raggi et al. investigated the hypoxic transcriptome and describe members of the CD300 superfamily of immunoregulatory cell surface receptors which are up-regulated in hypoxia.

4.         “HIF Transcription Factors, Inflammation, and Immunity”, Palazon et al., Immunity 41, October 16, 2014

Hypoxia-signaling pathways which trigger HIF expression act in the immune system to modulate host immune function. In this review, Palazon et al. describe the myriad ways oxygen sensing regulates innate and adaptive immunity.

5.         “Hypoxia attenuates the proinflammatory response in colon cancer cells by regulating IκB”, Mueller-Edenborn, Oncotarget April 2015

Mueller-Edenborn’s group shed light on signalling pathways regulating hypoxia and inflammatory responses, which exhibit a surprising degree of cross-talk in colon cancer. Hypoxia attenuated proinflammatory responses by inhibiting translocation of NF-κB into the nucleus, demonstrating yet again that both these aspects of the tumour microenvironment influence therapy response.

Free T-Shirt: Hypoxia Research

 

Do you culture cells in hypoxic conditions? For a limited time only, you can earn a free t-shirt by taking a few minutes to answer our questions and help us to better fulfil your cell culture needs.

We want to know what your research focus is, how you conduct your cell culture and how you think oxygen content might influence aspects of your cell culture.

Please click here to complete a very short online form.

New: Airlock Tray Storage Racks

We have produced a new airlock tray storage rack for our Anaerobic and Hypoxic Workstations, which can hold up to 4 airlock trays.

Manufactured from powder-coated aluminium, these racks are lightweight and durable, and a convenient way to organise Petri dishes, tissue culture flasks, consumables and other small items.

You don’t even need a workstation fitted with a removable front, as the rack can be introduced into the chamber through the airlock. No excuse for an untidy workspace now!

For more information, please contact us and quote product code A06928.

Airlock Tray Storage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fastest Oxygen Control on the Market

If you need a workstation that responds rapidly to changes in oxygen set point, read on. We have conducted tests that lead us to believe that no other manufacturer’s hypoxic workstations are able to offer the same accuracy and speed of response to set point changes as those achievable in Whitley Hypoxystations.

(more…)

Studying Mitochondria in Hypoxia

Having recently attended the joint symposium on “Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure” and “Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, our product manager, Dr Burga Kalz Fuller of HypOxygen, was fascinated by the enthusiasm of the attendees and the wide range of topics. Some of these included:

  • Metabolic communication between different organs and tissues based on energy expenditure
  • Anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of thermogenic pathways in brown and beige fat
  • PINK1 and Parkin in mitophagy and MAPL/Drp1 in mitochondrial fission
  • The role of mitochondrial DNA in ageing and degenerative diseases
  • The influence of gut microbiota on human metabolism and gene expression through accessing intestinal chromatin
  • Localisation of fatty acids in lipid droplets or mitochondria in well-fed and starved cells
  • Postnatal mitochondrial remodelling in cardiomyocytes
  • Association of branched-chain amino acids with insulin resistance, obesity and coronary heart disease
  • Protection of cardiac mitochondria from elevated ROS in ischemia/reperfusion states.

    Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation
    Whitley i2 Instrument Workstation

What brought all these researchers to Santa Fe were the different facets of metabolism and energy homeostasis, with mitochondria proving the most common theme. Mitochondria are the primary oxygen sensors in the cell, operating through mechanisms of reactive oxygen species, HIF pathways, TOR signalling and other means. Physiological normoxia in healthy tissue is significantly lower than the 21% oxygen present in air, and oxygen tension in many disease states is even lower. As a result of this, in vitro cell culture performed under ambient conditions in a CO2 incubator is entirely unrepresentative of in vivo conditions in tissue.

(more…)

One City, Two Cultures

HypOxygen and Don Whitley Scientific are sponsoring a series of Keystone Symposia dealing with tumour micro environment (Vancouver), mitochondria and metabolism (Santa Fe), and immunity and inflammation (Olympic Valley). At the joint Keystone symposium on “Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure” and “Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction” in Santa Fe, research groups have come together to present their latest findings on metabolism.

Mitochondrial function is central to metabolism and energy sensing of the cells in all organs, and this joint meeting is bringing together researchers who gave talks on the regulation of metabolism under stress, mitochondrial quality control and dysregulated gluconeogenesis. Insight into the genes and the pathways controlling these processes at the cellular level is driving the search for more effective drugs.

(more…)

Did You Know: Whitley Workstations are Ethernet-enabled for Remote Access?

Have you ever wanted to check the status of your Whitley Workstation when you were away from the lab? Well now you can. Most of our new workstations are Ethernet-enabled so you can dial in and access the touch-screen control panel from the other side of the building, or even from the other side of the world. This allows you to check the current operating conditions of the workstation and, if activated, view any of the graphical screens. If necessary, you can then make changes to the parameters, i.e. temperature, humidity, O2 and CO2 levels from wherever, whenever!

(more…)